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VC Winners

Temporary Acting Leading Seaman James Joseph MagennisRead
Leading Seaman Magennis served as Diver in His Majesty's Submarine XE3 for her attack on 31st July, 1945, on a Japanese cruiser of the Atago class. Owing to the tact that XE3 was tightly jammed under the target the diver's hatch could not be fully opened, and Magennis had to squeeze himself through the narrow space available.
 
Lieutenant Ian Edward Fraser, Royal Naval ReserveRead
Lieutenant Fraser commanded His Majesty's Midget Submarine XE3 in a successful attack on a Japanese heavy cruiser of the Atago class at her moorings in Johore Strait, Singapore, on 31st July, 1945
 
Lieutenant Norman Douglas HolbrookRead
For most conspicuous bravery on 13th December, when in command of the Submarine B11, he entered the Dardanelles, and, notwithstanding the very difficult current, dived his vessel under five rows of mines and torpedoed the Turkish Battleship "Messudiyeh"
 
Lieutenant Commander Anthony Cecil Chapel MiersRead
Lieutenant Commander Miers sighted a northbound convoy of four troopships entering the South Corfu Channel and since they had been too far distant for him to attack initially, he decided to follow in the hope of catching them in Corfu Harbour.
 
Lieutenant Basil Charles Godfrey PlaceRead
Lieutenants Place and Cameron were the Commanding Officers of two of His Majesty's Midget Submarines X7 and X6 which on the 22nd September 1943 carried out a most daring and successful attack on the German Battleship Tirpitz, moored in the protected anchorage of Kaa fjord, North Norway.
 
Lieutenant Donald Cameron. Royal Naval ReserveRead
Lieutenants Place and Cameron were the Commanding Officers of two of His Majesty's Midget Submarines X7 and X6 which on the 22nd September 1943 carried out a most daring and successful attack on the German Battleship Tirpitz, moored in the protected anchorage of Kaa fjord, North Norway.
 
Lieutenant Peter Scawen Watkinson RobertsRead
On February 16th, in daylight, HM Submarine Thrasher attacked and sank a heavily escorted supply ship she was at once attacked by depth-charges and was bombed by aircraft. The presence of two unexploded bombs in the gun-casing was discovered when after dark the submarine surfaced and began to roll. Lieutenant Roberts and Petty Officer Gould volunteered to remove the bombs, which were of a type unknown to them.
 
Petty Officer Thomas William GouldRead
On February 16th, in daylight, HM Submarine Thrasher attacked and sank a heavily escorted supply ship she was at once attacked by depth-charges and was bombed by aircraft. The presence of two unexploded bombs in the gun-casing was discovered when after dark the submarine surfaced and began to roll. Lieutenant Roberts and Petty Officer Gould volunteered to remove the bombs, which were of a type unknown to them.
 
Lieutenant Richard Douglas SandfordRead
This officer was in command of Submarine C3, and most skilfully placed that vessel in between the piles of the viaduct before lighting his fuse and abandoning her.
 
Lieutenant Commander Malcolm David WanklynRead
On the evening of 24th May, 1941, whilst on patrol off the coast of Sicily, Lieutenant Commander Wanklyn, in command of His Majesty's Submarine Upholder, sighted a southbound enemy troop convoy, strongly escorted by Destroyers. The failing light was such that observation by periscope could not be relied on but a surface attack would have been easily seen. Upholder's listening gear was out of action. In spite of these severe handicaps Lieutenant Commander Wanklyn decided to press home his attack at short range.
 
Lieutenant Commander Geoffrey Saxon WhiteRead
The German battlecruiser "Goeben", which had been mined while attempting a raid against Mundros, ran aground off Nargara Point in the Dardanelles. Repeated air attacks failed to achieve any noticeable results and at dusk on 27th January, HM Submarine E14, under the command of Lieutenant Commander G.S. White left Imbros in the desperate hope of torpedoing her.
 
Lieutenant Edward Courtney BoyleRead
For most conspicuous bravery, in command of Submarine E14, when he dived his vessel under enemy minefields and entered the Sea of Marmara on the 27th April, 1915.
 
Commander John Wallace LintonRead
From the outbreak of war until HMS Turbulent's last patrol Commander Linton was constantly in command of submarines, and during that time inflicted great damage on the enemy. He sank one cruiser, one destroyer, one U-boat, wenty-eight supply ships, some 10000 tons in all, and destroyed three trains by gunfire.
 
Lieutenant Commander Martin Eric NasmithRead
For most conspicuous bravery in command of one of His Majesty's Submarines (HMS E11) while operating in the Sea of Marmara.
 

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